Yaniv Dinur

 

Milwaukee Symphony

 

"Dinur used subtle shifts in tempo to create a compelling give and take of energy throughout the first movement, allowing plenty of expressive room to the longest phrases, but bringing sharp focus to shorter passages. A graceful, musical take on the second movement gave way to a poignant yet always forward-leaning interpretation of the third movement. Dinur and the players proceeded to give an exciting delivery of the piece's fourth movement, filling it with gorgeous contrasts and letting its grandest melodies soar." [Brahms Symphony No. 3]

 

MILWAUKEE JOURNAL SENTINEL

 

 

Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

 

"The audience was dazzled by up-and-coming conductor Yaniv Dinur's thoughtful and inspired interpretations ... In addition to having a patent understanding of the pieces, the Israeli's interaction with the orchestra encouraged an infusion of spark and gracefulness into mainstream repertoire, as well as the compositions less commonly performed."

NOLA DEFENDER (Louisiana)

 

 

RTE National Symphony Orchestra

 

“It is rare to encounter such a young conductor who knows so exactly how to let music of this kind speak for itself. Nothing forward, each musical gesture felt right.”

IRISH TIMES

 


Louisiana Philharmonic Orchestra

 

“The day was carried by the last participant, Yaniv Dinur, whose Beethoven had the authority of a Toscanini, whose Fledermaus had the perception of tangible experience, and whose ‘Mambo!’ from West Side Story crackled and danced … He encouraged the orchestra's imagination, along with just enough specifics to make sure there was mutual understanding. His Beethoven was brutal, fast, brilliant, the full shock treatment of tension and conflict.”

HUFFINGTON POST

 

 

Jerusalem Symphony Orchestra

 

“Yaniv Dinur’s vigorous energy, sensitive dynamics and thoughtful articulation combined with a formidable authoritative command or the orchestral forces. In Tchaikovsky’s ‘Romeo and Juliet Overture,’ he conveyed a freshness that instilled new life into this often-heard work.”

 

JERUSALEM POST