Liza Ferschtman

 

 

CD with Het Gelders Orkest (Challenge Classics)

      FELIX MENDELSSOHN

      Violin Concerto, Op. 64 – Kees Bakels, conductor

      String Octet, Op. 20


"Oh, not another Mendelssohn Violin Concerto recording, I hear you cry. Well, yes, but wait: this one is worth exploring. These Dutch musicians treat the piece as a chamber work, the cut-down forces of the Het Gelders Orkest giving light and airy support to Liza Ferschtman's carefully judged, singing solo line. It works beautifully ... Ferschtman changes gear for the Octet, Op. 20, driving the inexhaustible exuberance of this youthful piece with thrilling intensity ..."

THE GUARDIAN


"Does the world need another recording of Mendelssohn's Violin Concerto? Liza Ferschtman bravely asks this question herself in the CD booklet, before telling us her new insights and her desire to share her discoveries. These don't leap out at you, but this is certainly an attractive performance. She has a focused, silvery tone, and her playing has constant energy."

THE STRAD

 

 

Bremen Philharmonic

 

"... With a forceful manner of playing, which thanks to immaculate bowing pays ample tribute to the tiniest details, the violinist Liza Ferschtman of Russian birth conveyed the vast palette of changing mood themes.  Opening with a brief and inspirational violin solo, eruptions of sound form in a highly charged alternation of sequences, in turn opulent and driven by overflowing emotional force, also delicately conveyed and lyrical, or lively and cheerful, all seamlessly connected.  Thunderous applause." [Prokofiev Violin Concerto No. 2]

WESER-KURIER

 


Dallas Symphony

 

“Comprising the [Bernstein] Serenade “after Plato’s Symposium” and the orchestra’s first-ever performance of his Third Symphony, it was compelling start to finish … Dutch violinist Liza Ferschtman gave a commanding performance, by turns gutsy and sweetly singing …” [Serenade]

 

DALLAS MORNING NEWS

 

 

London Philharmonic

 

"Enter the Russian-Dutch violinist Liza Ferschtman whose dramatic platform appearance perfectly suited a superbly passionate performance.  Her playing was authoritative, decisive, virtuosic and brave ..." [Bruch Violin Concerto No. 1]

THE ARGUS


 

BBC National Orchestra of Wales

 

"The highlight of a 'five-star' concert was the performance of Dvorák's strangely neglected violin concerto.  It contains all the lyricism, virtuosity, scale and, in the typically Dvorákian final movement furiant, high spirits, that one could wish for in a Romantic concerto.  In the marvellously persuasive hands of the brilliant young Dutch violinist Liza Ferschtman it could not have wished for a more convincing endorsement – passionate and totally committed."

SOUTH WALES ARGUS

 

 

Budapest Festival Orchestra

 

“ … with Dutch violinist Liza Ferschtman bringing refined beauty and character to the solo part of the Bernstein [Serenade] … the concert was nothing short of revelatory.”

NEW YORK TIMES

 


Library of Congress Recital

 

“The high point was the [Schubert] Fantasy in C. No music was on hand for either Ferschtman or Barnatan, for one of the longest, most difficult duos ever written. I'd never seen this feat attempted anywhere, and the performance was extraordinary at all levels.  Ferschtman's intonation was not infallible in the variation section, but the unanimity between the artists, down to the tiniest nuance, was almost eerie.  It was a true tour de force of ensemble playing.”

WASHINGTON POST

 

 

CD with The Netherlands Symphony Orchestra (Challenge Classics)

     LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

     Violin Concerto – Jan Willem de Vriend, conductor

 

“It’s not easy to bring off this wonderful piece on the violin … but she succeeds triumphantly … Ferschtman’s interpretation is constantly illuminating.”

                                                                                                GRAMOPHONE MAGAZINE

 


Budapest Festival Orchestra

 

“Ms. Ferschtman brought laserlike purity and intensity to Bernstein’s Serenade, which was conceived as a five-part Platonic dialogue in praise of love.  Her sound was melting and lustrous in the long phrases of the first movement, Phaedrus, and alluringly veiled in Aristophanes.  In the fast spiccato passages of Erixymachus it showed satisfying bite.”    

NEW YORK TIMES